Aliquam Feugiat

We provide affordable Non-Lawyer document preparation services. You should not use our services as a substitute for obtaining legal advice.

We are not attorneys licensed to practice law in the State of Florida. We are not a government agency and our website and/or Martin Business Consulting, representatives, officers, employees and agents do not provide legal advice regarding your case.

Residency requirements for a Divorce in Florida

Grounds for a Divorce in Florida

if your Marriage is Irretrievably broken or there is a Mental Incapacity of one of the parties for at least 3 years before Filing for Divorce in Florida.

Child Support

Child support will be calculated in our Office using the Florida State Child Support Guidelines

Assets and Debts

Assets and Debts are generally considered to be Bank Accounts, Cars, Boats, Motorcycles, Trailers, Homes, IRA's, Bonds, Stocks, 401(K)'s, Real Estate, Retirement Plans, Valuable Household Items.

Types of Divorce

Uncontested Divorce (No Property and No Minor Child(ren))

You and your spouse have agreed on all issues in your Florida Divorce. You have already split all of your assets and debts between yourselves and you do not have any dependent or minor children. Each party is willing to sign the Florida divorce documents in front of a Notary.

Uncontested Divorce (With Property but No Minor Child(ren))

You and your spouse agree on all issues in your Florida Divorce. You have decided how to split up your assets and debts. You don't have any minor or dependent children. Each party is willing to sign the Florida divorce documents in front of a Notary.

Uncontested Divorce (With Property and Minor Child(ren))

You and your spouse agree on all issues in your Florida Divorce. You have decided how to split up your assets and debts and you have decided how to handle the issues relating to the minor child(ren) regarding Parental Responsibility, Time Sharing, and Child Support. Each party is willing to sign the Florida divorce documents in front of a Notary.

Contested Divorce (No Property and No Child(ren))

You and your spouse have no assets or debts or have previously split all assets and debts and there is no minor child(ren). This type of divorce is used usually when the other party is Not willing to sign off on their part of the divorce documents.

Contested Divorce (With Property and No Child(ren))

You and your spouse cannot agree on how to split your assets and debts, or there is alimony (spousal support) issue. There is no minor child(ren) involved in this action. This type of divorce is common when there is an issue or issues. You will need to have the other party personally served in this type of action, and the court will help decide the issues of the Dissolution of Marriage (Divorce).

Contested Divorce (With Child(ren)

You and your spouse cannot agree on all issues. Either pertaining to splitting up the assets and debts, issues regarding parental responsibility or time-sharing. You will need to have the other party served and the Court can help or decide the issues of the Dissolution of Marriage (Divorce).

Lost Spouse

When filing an action for Dissolution of Marriage (Divorce) in Florida and you do not know the whereabouts of your spouse and your spouse is unable to be personally served, you have what is considered to be a Lost Spouse Divorce. This type of divorce can be one of the most lengthy and costly types of divorce because you have to make a concerted effort to locate your spouse. You will have to notify several government agencies and other local entities of the area where your spouses last known address was. If the spouse is found, you will then need to have him personally served similar to a contested divorce.

Paternity

Paternity is the legal establishment of parental rights of a child’s biological father. When the mother and father of a child are married, the mother’s husband is presumed to be the biological father of the child, although this may be refuted. However, when a child is born out of wedlock, the mother is the natural, legal custodian of the child and the biological father of the child does not have legal rights until paternity has been established. Similarly, there is no legal obligation for the father of a child born out of wedlock to pay child support until paternity of the child has legally been established.

Paternity cases can be very frustrating and emotion for both parties. Until paternity has been established, there is no visitation schedule or parenting plan in place that allows the father timesharing with the child. Likewise, until paternity has been established there is no order obligating the biological father of the child to pay child support.

Establishment of Paternity

Either the mother or father of a child may initiate a paternity action. Paternity of a child born out of wedlock must be legally established in order for the child’s biological father to have parental and visitation rights. This is done by filing a Petition to Establish Paternity.

The establishment of paternity also obligates the biological father of the child to pay child support, assuming the child resides with his/her mother. A paternity action is the proper legal mechanism to be used by a mother seeking the father of her child to pay child support.

The establishment of paternity may also include other issues, such as DNA testing, legal actions brought against fathers by the Florida Department of Revenue, and the legal name change of a child once paternity has been established.

Once paternity has been established, the court then establishes a parenting plan and visitation (now called timesharing) schedule, along with ordering child support pursuant to Florida’s child support guidelines. The court will establish a parenting plan and visitation schedule based upon what the court believes is in the best interest of the child. The father of a child born out of wedlock may also obtain custody of a child through the legal action establishing paternity.

Let's make it happen! Contact us today to set up a complimentary consultation regarding your Florida Divorce.